Getting Your Child Accustomed to New Glasses

Little girl trying on glasses

Helping Your Child Adjust to New Glasses

Whether your child just started wearing glasses for the first time or recently got new glasses, getting used to a pair of glasses can take a little time. These four tips may help ease the adjustment process.

Consider Your Child's Opinion When Selecting Frames

Chances are you wouldn't like wearing glasses very much if someone else insisted that you pick an unattractive pair. Your children probably feel the same way. In fact, they may be more likely to wear glasses without complaint if they choose them. Obviously, some factors may make some frames off-limits, but your kids should be able to find a stylish pair of frames in your price range.

Letting your child choose a special eyeglass case may also make wearing glasses more appealing. They may find a case that they really like at the optometrist's office, where there are plenty of cute, colorful choices.

Make Comfort a Priority

Eyeglasses aren't much fun to wear if they constantly slip down your nose, pinch your nose, or hurt your ears. When you help your child select glasses, consider the fit carefully. Make sure:

  • The frames cover at least 80 percent of your child's field of vision
  • Arms aren't too tight or too loose
  • Nose pads aren't uncomfortable
  • The frame isn't too heavy
  • The glasses don't slip down when your child bends his or her head

Although it's certainly possible to make some adjustments to the frames, it may not be possible to make an uncomfortable pair of glasses comfortable. If the glasses don't feel good when your child puts them on, they may not be the right choice.

No matter how well the glasses fit normally, they may slip a little when your child plays. Silicone ear locks or grips placed over the earpieces of the glasses prevent slipping and are barely noticeable.

Discuss the Adjustment Process

Let your child know that he or she may feel a little disoriented or notice slightly blurry vision after putting on a new pair of glasses. Headaches and eyestrain may also occur as your child gets used to his or her eyeglass prescription. All About Vision notes that these issues occur as the brain becomes accustomed to the new prescription.

Luckily, these issues usually go away in two to three days at most. While your child adjusts to the glasses, short breaks are perfectly okay, Although your child should try to wear the glasses most of the day, taking them off occasionally won't be harmful and may ease the adjustment process. If your son or daughter experiences issues that last longer than a few days, let your optometrist know.

Offer Encouragement

Wearing glasses may not seem quite as exciting once the novelty wears off. Compliments and encouragement can help your child feel better about wearing glasses, particularly if they have gotten a few negative comments at school.

If you start counting family members, friends, classmates, sports figures, and fictional characters who wear glasses, your child may be surprised at just how many people wear glasses. Reading books about getting glasses, such as "Arlo Needs Glasses" or "Peppa's First Glasses", may help young children feel more enthusiastic about wearing glasses.

Of course, rewards can also be helpful. Receiving stickers at the end of every day or choosing a small prize at the end of a week may give your child a little extra incentive to keep the glasses on.

Is it time for your child's next eye exam? Contact our office to schedule a visit for your son or daughter.

Sources:

All About Vision: Does It Take Long to Adjust to New Glasses?, 3/20

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus: Glasses for Children

WebMD: How to Pick Your Kid’s Glasses, 10/15/20

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  • "We see Dr.Kannar & Dr.Jacquinot often, myself, my husband and my son love them both and their staff. They are all great people! I highly recommend them!"
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