What Contacts Will Work for Me?

Image of an eye.

Although glasses are often a lower maintenance choice, many people choose to wear contacts for comfort or aesthetic reasons. Whether you are nearsighted or farsighted, contacts are a safe, easy way to correct your vision to 20/20. With a variety of options to choose from, getting contacts may seem confusing. Consider your options and consult with your optometrist to find a great brand that works for you.

Hard vs. Soft Lenses

There are two major types of contact lenses -- hard and soft. In the United States, soft contact lenses are the most popular. Unless you specify otherwise or have a particular eye condition, your optometrist will likely recommend soft contacts. Soft lenses, made of a plastic and water compound, conform to the surface of your eye. They tend to be very comfortable and allow oxygen to reach your corneas.

If you’ve tried soft contacts and had challenges, your eye doctor may recommend hard contacts. As their name suggests, these lenses are more rigid, made of a flexible plastic. Hard contacts tend to be more breathable, allowing oxygen to reach your corneas. This reduces your risk of eye infections. However, hard lenses must be cleaned every day and may cause discomfort upon initial use. They may also slip from the center of your eye, leading to blurred vision or discomfort.

Disposable Lenses to Fit Your Lifestyle

When choosing a type of contact lenses, you must carefully consider your typical routine. If you tend to be forgetful or don’t like the hassle of cleaning lenses every day, extended wear soft contact lenses may be best. These contact lenses can be worn day and night, although you must clean them at least once per week. Extended wear contacts are moderately priced, but they can increase your risk of eye infections. Daily wear contacts, on the other hand, must be taken out each night to be disinfected. Daily wear contacts tend to be inexpensive and easy to use. If you only wear contacts occasionally or don’t like to worry about cleaning them, disposable contacts may be best. These contacts can be worn during the day and discarded each night -- no cleaning required.

Specialized Lenses to Match Your Needs

If you have a unique condition or need, there are other specialized lenses available. For example, hybrid lenses combine the features of both hard and soft contacts. People with an abnormal corneal shape or those who have difficulty tolerating hard lenses may like hybrid lenses, which have a hard center with a soft periphery.

Another popular specialized lense type is tinted lenses. Whether you want to alter your natural eye color or need to enhance your color perception, tinted lenses may be appropriate for you. Discuss tinted lenses with your eye doctor to ensure that they are safe; some costume lenses may be dangerous for your eyes.

Contact lens manufacturers continue to come out with new features, including improved breathability and comfort. Discuss your routine and needs during your next optometry exam to select the perfect pair of contact lenses to improve your vision and fit your lifestyle.

Sources:

American Optometric Association (2012). Advantages and disadvantages of various types of contact lenses.
Mayo Clinic (2012). Contact lenses: What to know before you buy.


Ask about our BOGO Deal!

Qualifying contact lens purchases are eligible for FREE polycarbonate single vision lenses

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Pittsburg

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Girard

Monday:

10:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Friday:

Closed

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Fort Scott

Monday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Locations

Find us on the map

  • "We see Dr.Kannar & Dr.Jacquinot often, myself, my husband and my son love them both and their staff. They are all great people! I highly recommend them!"
    Heather P.
  • "Dr Painter see both my husband and myself she is very pleasant and takes very good care of us she always take time to explain and makes sure our needs our taken care of."
    Brenda B.
  • "I went to the office in Girard and saw Dr Painter. The whole office is Wonderful! Very friendly and caring. My glasses are perfect! Won't go anywhere else!"
    Linda M.
  • "Pittsburg is lucky to have you Dr. Kannarr (as am I ) Thanks for everything you do for your patients!"
    Becky O.

Featured Articles

Read up on Informative Topics

  • Dry Eye

    Sometimes your eyes don’t make enough tears or the tears evaporate too fast because they don’t have the right amount of compounds in them. This is called dry eye. Up to 5% of Americans complain of some form of dry eye. Individuals who wear contact lenses or have undergone LASIK or other types of ...

    Read More
  • Subconjunctival Hemorrhage

    Similar to a bruise under the skin, a subconjunctival hemorrhage happens when a small blood vessel located between the sclera (white portion of an eye) and the conjunctiva (lining on the surface of an eye) breaks and covers the sclera with blood. Unlike broken blood vessels located under the skin which ...

    Read More
  • Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses

    Colored contact lenses allow you to temporarily change your eye color whether or not you need to correct impaired vision. In this way, you can create a more subtle eye appearance, wear a crazy design for special occasions, or just enjoy a new eye color. Will Colored Contacts Change the Way I See? Yes, ...

    Read More
  • Wandering Eye

    A wandering eye is a type of eye condition known as strabismus or tropia, and it may be caused by damage to the retina or muscles that control the eye, stroke or brain injury, or an uncorrected refractive error like farsightedness. With a wandering eye, one eye deviates or wanders in a different direction ...

    Read More
  • Reading and Writing

    For many adults, reading and writing come so naturally that they seem almost effortless. However, reading and writing are actually complicated skills that take significant effort to learn. For example, reading involves recognizing letters, associating letter combinations with their corresponding sounds, ...

    Read More
  • Lazy Eye

    Lazy eye, also referred to as amblyopia, is a condition that develops in infancy or early childhood, and it typically starts when the focus in one eye is more enhanced than the other. The eye with less focus might be impaired due to a significant amount of farsightedness or astigmatism, or something ...

    Read More
  • Dyslexia

    Dyslexia When a child has difficulty reading due to problems recognizing speech sounds and learning how they connect to words and letters, the condition is known as dyslexia, a learning disorder caused by genetic traits that disturb how the brain works. It affects areas of the brain dealing with language ...

    Read More
  • Crossed Eyes

    Crossed eyes, also known as strabismus, refer to a condition in which both eyes do not look at the same place at the same time. Often times they both turn in, but may also turn out. What Causes Crossed Eyes? The six muscles attached to each eye, which control how it moves, receive signals from the brain. ...

    Read More
  • Autism

    Symptoms and Problems Caused By Autism Autism is a neurological disorder in which the person has difficulty processing and reacting to information received from their senses. The individual also has trouble communicating and interacting socially. Signs of autism include: Lack of shared social interaction Postponement ...

    Read More
  • ADD/ADHD

    Approximately 11% of school-aged children have been diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to recent studies. The central symptoms of ADHD -- difficulty sustaining attention, poor control of behavior, hyperactivity -- make it difficult for children to succeed in school. ...

    Read More

Newsletter Sign Up