Corneal Ulcer

Corneal Ulcer

The cornea is present as a clear tissue that is located at the front of the eye. A corneal ulcer occurs when there is a sore in the layer of the cornea. Symptoms of this include redness, drainage, visual disturbances, sensitivity to light, itching and discomfort.

Causes and Effects of Corneal Ulcers

The most common cause of a corneal ulcer is infection. This can occur following damage to the eye. Other possible causes include fungi, eye dryness, a scratch in the eye, an inflammatory disorder, allergic eye disorders, and viruses.

Contact lens wearers are especially prone to corneal ulcers, especially if they wear their contacts while sleeping or while swimming.

Changes in vision may take place after a corneal ulcer has healed. It can also cause long term damage to the vision and even a loss of the eye itself. In some cases a corneal transplant may even be necessary. This is why it is important to seek treatment as soon as possible after noticing any symptoms.

Treatment of Corneal Ulcers

After examination of the eye, the eye care professional will determine what type of treatment is needed. If the corneal ulcer was caused by bacteria the doctor will likely prescribe a topical antibiotic for the eye. Culture of the eye drainage may be taken for further examination. If the doctor suspects a fungal infection topical anti-fungal medication may be needed. If the corneal ulcer is severe, oral agents may also be prescribed.

Prevention of Corneal Ulcers

The best way to avoid suffering from a corneal ulcer is protection of the eye. When doing any type of work or activity that would put yourself at risk for damage to the eye you should wear some type of mask, safety glasses, or goggles. If you are prone to dry eyes you can administer lubricating eye drops as needed. Contact lens wearers need to take proper care of the lenses in cleaning them and storing them. Contact lenses should never be worn while sleeping or swimming. Most importantly, proper hand washing is a must to avoid transmitting bacteria to the eye. This is the first line of defense in protecting your health.

Ask about our BOGO Deal!

Qualifying contact lens purchases are eligible for FREE polycarbonate single vision lenses

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Pittsburg

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Girard

Monday:

10:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Friday:

Closed

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Fort Scott

Monday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Locations

Find us on the map

  • "We see Dr.Kannar & Dr.Jacquinot often, myself, my husband and my son love them both and their staff. They are all great people! I highly recommend them!"
    Heather P.
  • "Dr Painter see both my husband and myself she is very pleasant and takes very good care of us she always take time to explain and makes sure our needs our taken care of."
    Brenda B.
  • "I went to the office in Girard and saw Dr Painter. The whole office is Wonderful! Very friendly and caring. My glasses are perfect! Won't go anywhere else!"
    Linda M.
  • "Pittsburg is lucky to have you Dr. Kannarr (as am I ) Thanks for everything you do for your patients!"
    Becky O.

Featured Articles

Read up on Informative Topics

  • Wandering Eye

    A wandering eye is a type of eye condition known as strabismus or tropia, and it may be caused by damage to the retina or muscles that control the eye, stroke or brain injury, or an uncorrected refractive error like farsightedness. With a wandering eye, one eye deviates or wanders in a different direction ...

    Read More
  • Reading and Writing

    For many adults, reading and writing come so naturally that they seem almost effortless. However, reading and writing are actually complicated skills that take significant effort to learn. For example, reading involves recognizing letters, associating letter combinations with their corresponding sounds, ...

    Read More
  • Lazy Eye

    Lazy eye, also referred to as amblyopia, is a condition that develops in infancy or early childhood, and it typically starts when the focus in one eye is more enhanced than the other. The eye with less focus might be impaired due to a significant amount of farsightedness or astigmatism, or something ...

    Read More
  • Dyslexia

    Dyslexia When a child has difficulty reading due to problems recognizing speech sounds and learning how they connect to words and letters, the condition is known as dyslexia, a learning disorder caused by genetic traits that disturb how the brain works. It affects areas of the brain dealing with language ...

    Read More
  • Crossed Eyes

    Crossed eyes, also known as strabismus, refer to a condition in which both eyes do not look at the same place at the same time. Often times they both turn in, but may also turn out. What Causes Crossed Eyes? The six muscles attached to each eye, which control how it moves, receive signals from the brain. ...

    Read More
  • Autism

    Symptoms and Problems Caused By Autism Autism is a neurological disorder in which the person has difficulty processing and reacting to information received from their senses. The individual also has trouble communicating and interacting socially. Signs of autism include: Lack of shared social interaction Postponement ...

    Read More
  • ADD/ADHD

    Approximately 11% of school-aged children have been diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to recent studies. The central symptoms of ADHD -- difficulty sustaining attention, poor control of behavior, hyperactivity -- make it difficult for children to succeed in school. ...

    Read More
  • Ocular Motor Dysfunction

    Parents are often aware of the need to screen children for nearsightedness or farsightedness, but fewer know about other pediatric vision problems. Ocular motor dysfunction is a condition that often manifests in childhood, although adults may also have this disorder. Because ocular motor dysfunction ...

    Read More
  • Convergence Insufficiency

    Convergence insufficiency is a relatively common eye condition that is typically diagnosed in childhood. A study of two large optometry clinics found that 17.6% of children who received vision exams had convergence insufficiency. As this disorder may cause difficulty focusing on written pages, some children ...

    Read More
  • Accommodative Dysfunction

    Simply put, accommodative dysfunction means that the eyes have difficulty focusing properly. Studies suggest that between 2 and 17% of children may suffer from accommodative dysfunction. The nature of this disorder means that it sometimes goes unnoticed in standard vision screenings conducted at school. ...

    Read More

Newsletter Sign Up